It has been more than four months since the new iPad was launched, and despite strong international sales, usage numbers point to a fading consumer fervor around the device in North America.

It has been more than four months since the new iPad was launched, and despite strong international sales, usage numbers point to a fading consumer fervor around the device in North America. As per our last report in April, in just three weeks the new iPad had captured 10% of all iPad traffic in the U.S. and Canada. However, a look at the current numbers shows that the pace has regressed.

The most recent Chitika Insights study examined all iPad traffic across the Chitika ad network. The data gathered represented North American traffic from July 17th to July 23rd, which was then segmented using a user agent analysis to determine device type. The following graph showcases the study’s results:

The new iPad now represents 17.98% of the total iPad impressions on the Chitika network in North America.  After its torrid pace during the first three weeks following its release, the new iPad’s share has increased from 10% to just 17.98% in the past four months – a rate of adoption subpar by Apple’s standards for excellence touted during the device’s release.

Earlier studies have pointed to more than 60% of iPad traffic still being generated by the iPad 2. This large share may be due to the perceived minute differences between the iPad 2 and iPad 3, discouraging users of older iPads to upgrade. The new iPad differs from the iPad 2 with a Retina display, faster 4G LTE capability, and 5-megapixel camera. Hence, only those users who play graphic-intensive games, want fast mobile data capabilities in addition to WiFi, or use it as a digital camera will likely see the need to buy the new device.

Chitika Insights also determined the new iPad’s traffic distribution on a state-by-state basis. The earlier report identified California as the leading state for new iPad Web usage, but the latest analysis shows a surprising change in these statistics; Utah now leads all states with 25.31% of all iPad traffic coming from the newest device. Hawaii moved into the second spot with 21.55% while Tennessee and West Virginia are two of the least new iPad-friendly states.

National adoption for the new iPad isn’t very impressive when compared to its elder siblings, but with the proliferation of post-PC-era products, the tablet market seems to be one of the most active. With newer iPad versions to be released in September headlined by the rumored iPad Mini, Apple seems adamant to maintain its control over the tablet market and overshadow new tablets manufactured by Google and Microsoft.