According to Chitika Insights’ live Firefox version tracker, Firefox 14 is achieving strong rates of adoption within the Firefox family following its release on July 17th. Yet, our latest numbers show Google’s Chrome 21, released two weeks after Firefox 14, is already responsible for 75.7% of all Chrome traffic – nearly 9% higher than the adoption rate seen for Firefox 14.

According to Chitika Insights’ live Firefox version tracker, Firefox 14 is achieving strong rates of adoption within the Firefox family following its release on July 17th. Yet, our latest numbers show Google’s Chrome 21, released two weeks after Firefox 14, is already responsible for 75.7% of all Chrome traffic – nearly 9% higher than the adoption rate seen for Firefox 14. (Note: Images below represent adoption rate data on August 6th, 2012):

Additionally, one full day following its July 31st release, Chrome 21 was already being utilized for 24.9% of all Chrome-based traffic. This is almost six times higher than Firefox 14’s adoption rate when looking at the same time period in its lifecycle. (Note: Image below represents data on Aug 2, 2012):

Firefox 14 only occupied a 3.5% share among all Firefox traffic a full day following its release (Note: Image below represents data on July 18, 2012):

Despite the comparison, Firefox 14 is doing twice as well as its predecessor Firefox 13 which had an adoption of 32% close to three weeks following its release on June 5th. Although Firefox 13 had an automatic, “silent update” feature like the most recent version, its actual rate of adoption was much slower. Mozilla blamed this subpar performance on its issuance of an emergency patch called “chem spill” which, according to the company, slowed down the silent updating process. The patch’s purpose was to fix the frequent crashes that were caused by Adobe’s Flash Player plug-in.

While it’s evident that Firefox’s “silent update” feature has helped Mozilla improve its adoption rates, Google’s enviable figures indicate that there is still a lot of room for Mozilla to improve in order to compete with outside competitors.